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Almost Home: A Family’s Dedication to Impacting the Lives of Others

April 29, 2013 Print

Following a generous gift from the Patrick B. Sands family that allowed McLean Hospital to open a transitional living program for young women who have completed one of 3East’s dialectical behavior therapy (DBT) programs for individuals with emerging borderline personality disorder, Patrick Sands said he was overwhelmed by the number of parents who thanked him for making such a program possible.

“Families were telling me they didn’t know what they would have done had the 3East Community Residence not been available to them,” said Sands, whose daughter Peyton was successfully treated at 3East and whose experience needing a structured community setting to help her transition back to a fulfilling life inspired the generous gift. “This was the most rewarding thing that has happened to me in my life and I am grateful that our family has been able to help other families as their daughters learn the skills they need to overcome borderline personality disorder.”

Patrick B. Sands
Patrick B. Sands

Located in Cambridge, just down the road from McLean’s main campus, the 3East Community Residence is an eight-bedroom home, offering alumnae of 3East’s intensive dialectical behavior therapy program a structured, supportive and therapeutic environment to return to after work or school.

Sands first became familiar with McLean after Peyton tried to take her own life and his family quickly learned there were few programs in the country that provided teenagers with treatment for borderline personality disorder.

“We looked all over the country for the best program to help Peyton and it became clear that McLean was the place that was going to be able to help her—and us,” said Sands. “3East saved Peyton’s life.”

The program also had a profound impact on Patrick’s life. During Peyton’s hospitalization, Patrick traveled to McLean weekly from Dallas, where the Sands family resides, to attend dialectical behavior therapy training for parents and families that is offered by the staff of 3East.

“The classes helped me better understand borderline personality disorder and they gave me greater insight into how DBT can be used in everyday situations,” said Sands. “My knowledge of DBT changed the way I communicate and helped me learn to be more mindful and to balance the logical and emotional sides of myself. These are skills that I have been able to apply both in my personal life and in business.”

Today, Peyton is thriving and Patrick is deeply grateful for the care she received at McLean. Patrick continues to be an active member of the McLean family, participating in its National Council and serving as an “ambassador” for the hospital.

“I’ve been helping other parents who call me because they know what our experience has been,” said Sands. “I am able to get them in touch with the right people at McLean and I know that McLean will do what it does best—help people in crisis.”